Bring An Equalizer to the Fight. Choose a Firm That Was Created to Advocate for Victims.

New Concussion Diagnosis Guidelines Aim to Protect Injured Athletes

Concussions may be the mildest form of traumatic brain injury. However, if they are not properly diagnosed and treated, they can have serious long-term consequences.

The American Academy of Neurology recently released updated guidelines for treating the estimated 1.6 to 3.8 million sports-related concussions that take place in the United States every year. They specifically encourage state and local policymakers to implement legislation and regulations to minimize the occurrence of sports-related concussion.

Below are a few of the AAP’s specific recommendations:

  • Any athlete who is suspected to have suffered a concussion, regardless of severity, is to be removed immediately from participation in a game or practice.
  • A licensed health care professional, such as a neurologist, whose scope of practice includes being properly trained in the evaluation and management of concussion, must clear the youth athlete before he or she can return to play. This includes sports recognized by high school athletic associations as well as youth and recreational leagues run by other entities.
  • Lawmakers and state health departments should implement sports concussion registries. Registries help physicians and researchers learn more about the impact of concussions, including how it affects student athlete performance in the classroom.

If you or someone you love has suffered a traumatic brain injury, it is crucial to receive the proper medical treatment. If you suspect a medical error was made regarding a TBI diagnosis or your insurance company is refusing to pay for TBI treatment, you likely need the assistance of an experienced personal injury attorney, particularly one who has handled traumatic brain injury lawsuits.